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Scientology library: “Sea Organization (Sea Org, SO)”

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apollo (formerly, "royal scot man"; often misspelled "royal scotman", "royal scotsman") • auditing • commodore's messenger organization (cmo) • confidential preclear (pc) folder • cost • david miscavige • e-meter • fort harrison hotel (also, flag land base) @ 210 south fort harrison avenue clearwater fl united states • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • gerald "gerry" armstrong • gold base (also, "int base") @ gilman hot springs • income • l. ron hubbard's credentials • lawsuit • mary sue (whipp) hubbard • membership • michael j. flynn • office of special affairs (osa) (formerly, guardian's office) • operation snow white • rehabilitation project force (rpf) • ronald "nibs" edward dewolf (l. ron hubbard, jr.) • salary • sea organization (sea org, so) • security check ("sec check") • suppressive person (sp)
Reference materials Sea Organization (Sea Org, SO)
38 matching items found between Jan 1980 and Dec 1984. Furthermore, there are 408 matching items for all time not shown.
Dateless  1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
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Nov 24, 1984
Mark and the Sea Orgs — The Weekend Australian
More: link, link
Type: Press
Author(s): Peter Menadue
Source: The Weekend Australian
According to Mark Hanna, missionaries are sometimes sent to Australia from the American Church of Scientology to look over operations and advise on improvements. The advice seems to be effective. Hanna says the Church has about 30,000 Australian members and is in the midst of an "unprecedented boom". During the day, the four floors of its Sydney headquarters at 201 Castlereagh St are occupied by about 60 Scientologists liaising with church offices in other states and training recruits. Off the foyer ...
Nov 19, 1984
Document outlines sect attempt to block testimony — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
It was just before midnight, May 28, 1984, when the orders were issued. Confidentially. "Mission information: ... recent reports from contacts made with Homer he is likely to go over to the enemy camp. He is thinking of turning against us completely. "Mission purpose: To prevent Homer from going over to the enemy camp and get him moving back onto The Bridge. "Vital Targets: ... Stay in close comm (communication) with MSN OPS (mission operations). Do not implement any decisions without ...
Nov 11, 1984
Horror story told in sect suit — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
CLEARWATER—Possibly the highest-ranking, most influential Scientologist to defect from the Clearwater-based, international sect has sued Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard for more than $225 million. Citing physical abuse, the intentional infliction of emotional distress, false imprisonment and the violation of his civil rights, Howard D. "Homer" Schomer, the 49-year-old former treasury secretary of the sect's Author Services Inc. branch, is demanding a jury trial and damages of $226,528,200. Schomer's claims, if proved true, offer a dark view of the ...
Oct 28, 1984
Sinking the Master Mariner — The Sunday Times (UK)
More: link, reprint in The Weekend Australian
Type: Press
Author(s): John Barnes
Source: The Sunday Times (UK)
"Corrupt, sinister and dangerous" were the words used to describe the Church of Scientology in a judgment given by Mr Justice Latey this summer. He also referred to it as "immoral and socially obnoxious". But who controls the Church now? A major Sunday Times Magazine investigation into the activities of the cult in America and Britain has uncovered a disturbing and extraordinary story — the takeover of the organisation by a small band of youthful fanatics following the disappearance of the ...
Tag(s): Advanced Ability CenterAlan WaltersAnnie M. Tidman (aka Annie Broeker aka Annie Logan aka Lisa Mitchell)Apollo (formerly, "Royal Scot Man"; often misspelled "Royal Scotman", "Royal Scotsman")AssetsAuditingAuthor Services, Inc. (ASI) (dba, Galaxy Press) (subsidiary of Church of Spiritual Technology)Battlefield EarthBent CorydonBlackmailBridge Publications, Inc. (BPI)CaliforniaCause Resurgence Rundown aka "Running Program"Church of Spiritual Technology (CST) (dba, L. Ron Hubbard Library)Commodore's Messenger Organization (CMO)Confidential preclear (PC) folderCostDavid MayoDavid MiscavigeDiane VoegedingEdward "Eddie" WaltersFalse imprisonmentFloridaFort Harrison Hotel (also, Flag Land Base) @ 210 South Fort Harrison Avenue Clearwater FL United StatesFraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentationGerald "Gerry" ArmstrongGold Base (also, "INT Base") @ Gilman Hot SpringsGolden Era ProductionsHard sellHeber C. JentzschHoward "Homer" D. SchomerIncomeInternal Revenue Service (IRS)InurementJay HurwitzJohn BarnesJudge Ben KrentzmanJudge Paul G. Breckenridge Jr.Justice Latey, Sir JohnKathleen "Kathy" GorgonKenneth McFarlaneLaurel J. Sullivan (née Watson)LawsuitLee LawrenceLyman D. SpurlockMarc YagerMary Sue (Whipp) HubbardMembershipMichael "Mike" GarsideMichael J. FlynnMission Holders ConferenceNew Era Publications International, ApS (NEPI)Operating Thetan (OT)Patrick D. "Pat" Broeker (aka Mike Mitchell)Registrar (also, to "reg")Rehabilitation Project Force (RPF)Religious Research Foundation (RRF)Religious Technology Center (RTC)Richard N. AznaranRon's Journal 38Ronald "Nibs" Edward DeWolf (L. Ron Hubbard, Jr.)Saint Hill Manor @ East Grinstead (UK)Sea Organization (Sea Org, SO)Security check ("sec check")Slave laborSouthern Land Development and Leasing Corporation (SLDLC)Stephen "Steve" MarloweSuppressive person (SP)Tax matterThe Sunday Times (UK)The Weekend AustralianTonja C. BurdenVicki J. (McRae) AznaranWarren L. McShaneWendell ReynoldsWilliam W. "Bill" Franks
Oct 7, 1984
Could Hubbard be hiding on Suncoast? — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
He may be the most highly visible "invisible" man on earth — Mr. Lafayette Ronald Hubbard. Although not seen publicly since 1980, the reclusive founder of the controversial Clearwater-based Church of Scientology is constantly the subject of newspaper stories, court testimony and television [?] around the world. L. Ron Hubbard, a flamboyant millionaire philosopher, adventurer and explorer, mystic and messiah, has become the Howard Hughes of our time. For no one knows — at least no one is saying — where ...
Jul 5, 1984
Disaffected Scientologists strike out on own — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
The Church of Scientology has lost thousands of adherents in recent years due to an internal revolt by members who embrace the teachings of founder L. Ron Hubbard but question many policies of the mother organization. Disillusioned Scientologists—still practicing the tenets of Dianetics and Scientology—have splintered from the Church of Scientology to form their own organizations such as the Clear Center, the Council for Spiritual Intregrity, Advanced Abilities Center and the Revitalization Center. Such assemblages offer Scientology and Dianetics-related courses to ...
Jun 22, 1984
Judge stings Scientologists — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
In a stinging rebuke to the Church of Scientology of California, a Los Angeles Superior Court Judge ruled Thursday that a former sect archivist was justified in taking about 10,000 Scientology documents when he fled the Clearwater-based sect in 1982. Most of the documents in question belonged to the reclusive 73-year-old founder of Scientology, L. Ron Hubbard, who has not been seen publicly since 1979. In his 12-page decision, Judge Paul G. Breckenridge said 37-year-old Gerald Armstrong—who was personally authorized by ...
Jun 2, 1984
Scientology: 'auditing' the 'engram' — Seattle Post-Intelligencer
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): John McCoy
Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer
The basic premise of the Church of Scientology is that humans can realize their full potential only if they clear away negative memories. The means of doing so were presented by science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard in the best-selling book "Dianencs," which he wrote in 1950. Hubbard argued that by a process of counseling ("auditing"), negative memories ("engrams") could be erased. Auditing involves the use of an E-meter, a sort of lie detector on which, the subject holds two tin ...
May 18, 1984
Defendant denies sect employment — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
LOS ANGELES—Gerald Armstrong steadfastly maintained Thursday that for 11 years he worked only for L. Ron Hubbard, and he refused to acknowledge Church of Scientology lawyers' contentions he was actually a sect employee. Time and again during his Superior Court trial, Armstrong brushed off suggestions of his sect employment, insisting he worked for Scientology founder Hubbard—regardless of the chain of command. "I was a Scientologist, and I worked for Mr. Hubbard," the former Scientology archivist told Superior Court Judge Paul G. ...
May 11, 1984
Ex-Scientologist says quest turned sour — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Myrna Oliver
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
A disillusioned former member of the Church of Scientology, accused of taking documents belonging to the church and its founder, L. Ron Hubbard, testified Thursday that he had been lured into the organization by the "promise of truth" but repeatedly encountered lies. Gerald Armstrong began what is expected to be several days of testimony in the non-jury trial of the church's civil suit to retrieve the documents, which is being tried before Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Paul G. Breckenridge Jr. ...
May 11, 1984
Former Scientologist recalls degradation — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): George-Wayne Shelor
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
LOS ANGELES—The horror, the degradation, the humiliation and the pain all caught up with Gerald Armstrong Thursday when he broke down in tears while testifying in Superior Court here about his 11 years within the Church of Scientology. The former sect archivist and subject of a suit Charging him with taking personal papers of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, Armstrong shook with sob while recalling his 17-month term in the Rehabilitation Project Force (RPF), a form of Scientology punishment where he ...
May 7, 1984
Capital disciple's story // How Martin Samuels built $10 million mission — Sacramento Bee (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dale Maharidge
Source: Sacramento Bee (California)
With $175 and a small box of books under his arm, Martin Samuels brought Scientology to the Sacramento area in the 1960s. He soon built a $10 million empire. The church rated his missions in Davis and Sacramento the best in the world. Then, in 1982, it all collapsed. Samuels left the church with nothing more than a suitcase half full of clothes. Samuels charges in a lawsuit that the Church illegally took it all away from him. The suit, being ...
May 6, 1984
For some, Scientology delivers the answers — Sacramento Bee (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dale Maharidge
Source: Sacramento Bee (California)
Whereas other religions may hold out promise of salvation, founder Hubbard offers immediate solution to problems Joann Harvey paused when asked why she took her life's savings of $45,000 and turned it over to the Sacramento Church of Scientology. "That's an interesting question," she said with a sigh. "Being in Scientology gave me an anchor point. The philosophy works. I know it." Harvey was nearing middle age and undergoing marital problems when she discovered Scientology. Sacramento businessman Don Pearson, on the ...
May 6, 1984
Scientology: A collapsing empire? — Sacramento Bee (California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dale Maharidge
Source: Sacramento Bee (California)
Church says it's stronger now, while some ex-leaders say end is inevitable First of two parts A hot wind blows through the masts of the $565,000 clipper ship "docked" on a rocky plateau in the middle of a Southern California desert. Down the hill, a car nears a gate guarded by young men in brown shirts. As if with the snap of unseen fingers, members of the elite Sea Org pour from buildings around the ship with cameras in hand, furiously ...
Apr 24, 1984
The cash cults move from beyond the fringe — The Bulletin (Australia)
Type: Press
Author(s): Bruce Stannard
Source: The Bulletin (Australia)
As the Christian world celebrates Easter more off-beat religions are enjoying a boom. In Sydney BRUCE STANNARD studies the now-legal Scientologists and in the US LAURENCE GRAFSTEIN profiles Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and other odd-balls. MOST minds are the slaves of external circumstances and conform to any hand that undertakes to mould them. - Samuel Johnson ''IN ALL the broad universe, there is no other hope for Man than ourselves. This is a tremendous responsibility. I have borne it myself too long ...
Item contributed by: Zhent (Anonymous)
Mar 10, 1983
Scientology: A church beset with problems // Scientology plagued by rumors, problems, dozens of civil suits — Vancouver Sun
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Shelley Fralic
Source: Vancouver Sun
Certainly, L. Ron Hubbard exists, says Janet Kenyon, public affairs director for the B.C. Church of Scientology. He has an office in downton Vancouver. "Come on in," says Kenyon, unfastening the purple velvet cable that is hooked across the entrance to L. Ron Hubbard's office at 401 West Hastings. His name is on the open door in gold-colored letters. A gleaming gold, or brass, letter opener lies on his desk. There are pictures of his kids. There is an unopened package ...
Mar 1, 1983
Morning Break: Hubbard's son [exact date unknown]
Feb 20, 1983
30 years later, the reclusive founder of Scientology keeps controversy swirling — Rocky Mountain News (Denver, Colorado)
Jan 31, 1983
Mystery of the Vanished Ruler — TIME Magazine
More: gerryarmstrong.org
Jan 24, 1983
Ministry of fear // Scandal rocks Scientology as the founder's wife goes to prison and his son turns prosecution witness — People magazine
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): John Saar
Source: People magazine
[Picture / Caption: Scientology's headquarters in L.A. was formerly the Cedars of Lebanon Hospital. The church purchased It for $5 million In 1977.] Last October in San Francisco, some 70 local leaders of the Church of Scientology gathered to hear nine church executives harangue them about their shortcomings. Styling themselves with titles that ranged from the quasi-military ("Commander," "Warrant Officer") to the quasi-lunatic ("International Finance Dictator"), the men announced that they represented the new hierarchy of the organization, and that they ...
Jan 18, 1983
New Scientology leaders reportedly plan to purge ranks — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: news.google.com
Type: Press
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
NEW YORK — A new group of leaders has emerged with a plan to purge what it calls deviationists from the ranks of Scientology, a magazine report says. "The 'anything goes' days are over," David Miscavige, 22, told a San Francisco conference of 70 local Scientology leaders, who gathered to hear him and eight other young leaders last October, People magazine said Sunday. The nine new leaders have assumed quasi-military titles and speak a special jargon composed of computerese and ...
Jan 17, 1983
Struggle to control power, money splits Scientologists — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: pqasb.pqarchiver.com
Jan 7, 1983
A 'new breed' reported taking over Scientology — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: news.google.com, news.google.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert Lindsey
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
Defections by older members and publicity given a legal battle over control of hundreds of millions of dollars are believed to be cutting into the membership of the Church of Scientology. The church, which has a headquarters in Clearwater, is described by its leaders as a religion and by its critics as a highly profitable business with cult-like overtones. The church claims a worldwide membership of 6-million, although former officials say the number of adherents is probably fewer than 700,000. According ...
Jan 6, 1983
Fight over funds divides Scientology group — New York Times
More: nytimes.com
Jul 14, 1982
Inside Scientology: Secret agents for a church — News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dennis Wheeler
Source: News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
"Theseus and his comrade Pirithous in their descent to Hades . . . sat down to rest for a while, only to find that they had grown to the rocks and could not rise." — Carl Jung, Modern Man In Search Of A Soul Ford and Andrea Schwartz are a typical American couple, perhaps. They're 33 and 28 years old, respectively, and they live in a middle-class apartment in Concord. A Volkswagen van rests in the carport. Their three-year-old son likes ...
Jul 7, 1982
Inside Scientology: "Attack the Attacker" — News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dennis Wheeler
Source: News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
Several former policies of the Church of Scientology, founded by L. Ron Hubbard, have persistently tainted its public image. Scientologists say these policies were either "jokes" from the very beginning, or were misunderstood by the public — and in any case they have all been canceled. Most of these policies involve ways the Church deals with people it has labeled "Potential Trouble Sources" and "Suppressive Persons." The latter are "those who are destructively antisocial" or those who "actively seek to suppress ...
Jun 9, 1982
Inside Scientology: Is it a religion, a science fiction fantasy, or just another cult? — News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Dennis Wheeler
Source: News-Herald (Santa Rosa, California)
The year was 1950. The book was Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health, written by a 39-year-old "pulp" writer of science fiction, L. Ron Hubbard. A few months earlier, Hubbard had outlined the book's tenets in a magazine called Astounding Science Fiction. And a year before that, at a lecture for science fiction writers, Hubbard had mused, "Writing for a penny a word is ridiculous. If a man really wanted to make a million dollars, the best way would be ...
May 8, 1982
City of Clearwater 1982 Hearings - Church of Scientology: LaVenda Van Schaick
May 7, 1982
Ex-Scientologists detail grim lifestyle — St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
More: news.google.com, news.google.com, link
Type: Press
Author(s): John Harwood
Source: St. Petersburg Times (Florida)
CLEARWATER — Life at the Church of Scientology's Fort Harrison Hotel was so miserable, Lori Taverna remembered Thursday, that "I felt that I was in . . . an insane asylum." Casey Kelly recalled being distressed by the hard work and low pay. "Here I was, working 70 to 80 hours a week, and I was making $20," Kelly said. "This did not jive." Eventually both Kelly, 23, and Ms. Taverna, 39, quit Scientology. Thursday they testified before Clearwater city commissioners ...
May 7, 1982
Fort Harrison: 'horror house' — Clearwater Sun (Florida)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Bill Prescott
Source: Clearwater Sun (Florida)
A 17-year veteran of the Church of Scientology told Clearwater city commissioners Thursday she lived through "horror" while staying at the former Fort Harrison Hotel three years ago. Lori Taverna, who said she broke with the sect two months ago, was asked by Mayor Charles LeCher to describe a "normal day" while she worked as a Scientology trainer. "Most of it was horror, so I don't know," said Mrs. Taverna, 39. But in about three hours of testimony during the second ...
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.