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Scientology library: “Fred Leeson”

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church of scientology mission of davis • church of scientology of california (csc) • confidential preclear (pc) folder • deprogramming • earle c. cooley • fair game • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • fred leeson • garry p. mcmurry • gerald "gerry" armstrong • hard sell • income • inurement • judge donald h. londer • julie christofferson titchbourne • julie christofferson titchbourne vs. church of scientology, et al. • l. ron hubbard's credentials • laurel j. sullivan (née watson) • lawsuit • martin l. samuels • private investigator(s) • refunds • registrar (also, to "reg") • the oregonian (portland) • william w. "bill" franks
30 matching items found between Jan 1985 and Dec 1985.
Dateless  1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
All time 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14
Page 1 of 1: ⇑ Latest    ↑ Later    Earlier ↓    Earliest ⇓
May 26, 1985
The selling of Scientology // Hubbard's motivations revealed in correspondence — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
Three years after publishing a best-selling book in 1950 about his theories for improving mental health, L. Ron Hubbard, 42, was living in Spain and worrying about money. An idea struck him. Why not present Scientology as a religion, he suggested in a letter written to Helen O'Brien, then the head of an organization for marketing his mental health concepts known as the Hubbard Association of Scientologists. This was the formative stage of the Church of Scientology. Over the next 30 ...
May 21, 1985
Lawyer's tactics 'gift from heaven' for Titchbourne side — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
PORTLAND ATTORNEY Ted Runstein was arguing a pretrial motion last March on behalf of the Church of Scientology when a portly Boston Irishman with thinning red hair and a fat briefcase ambled into the courtroom and parked himself at the counsel table. "I'm too old to fight the preliminaries," the Boston lawyer told Multnomah Circuit Judge Donald H. Londer. "I'm just measuring the ring and getting a feel for the rules. I'll be here for the main event." Such was the ...
May 21, 1985
Scientology trial jurors ignored advertising blitz — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
The Church of Scientology in Portland waged an expensive, large-scale advertising campaign throughout the fraud trial that led to a $39 million verdict against the church and its founder, but jurors said they paid no attention to it. Printed advertisements appeared frequently in daily and weekly newspapers in the Portland area throughout the 10-week trial, and radio and television commercials were played on several local stations. Two jurors who were interviewed Monday said the jury's decision was based on long discussions ...
May 19, 1985
Scientology jury awards $39 million — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A Multnomah County Circuit Court jury awarded $39 million in punitive damages Friday to a Portland woman after finding she was victimized by "wanton misconduct" by the Church of Scientology and its founder, L. Ron Hubbard. The verdict was returned in favor of Julie Christofferson Titchbourne, 27, after 2½ days of deliberation and a 10-week trial. One of her lawyers, Ronald L. Wade, said it was the biggest punitive damages verdict in Oregon history. John Carmichael, president of the Church of ...
May 18, 1985
Titchbourne hopes $39 million award may help others — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
After winning a $39 million judgment against the Church of Scientology late Friday afternoon, Julie Christofferson Titchbourne said she hoped to establish a foundation to help other victims of thought-control organizations. Titchbourne, a soft-spoken civil engineer who hugged her mother, husband and lawyers after hearing the jury's decision, said she hoped her experience could be turned to an advantage for others whose lives need rebuilding. During a brief appearance before reporters outside the courtroom door, neither Titchbourne nor one of her ...
May 18, 1985
Woman awarded $39 million in Scientology suit — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A Multnomah County Circuit Court jury awarded $39 million in punitive damages Friday to a Portland woman after finding that she was victimized by "wanton misconduct" by the Church of Scientology and its founder, L. Ron Hubbard. The verdict was returned in favor of Julie Christofferson Titchbourne, 27, after 2½ days of deliberations and a 10-week trial. One of her lawyers, Ronald L. Wade, said it was the biggest punitive damages verdict in Oregon history. The jury also awarded fraud damages ...
May 16, 1985
Scientology defense religion-based — The Oregonian (Portland)
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Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A civil fraud suit in Portland seeking $42 million in punitive damages against the Church of Scientology was described Tuesday as the "broadest-based attack on religion that has ever happened in the history of man." Earle C. Cooley, a Boston attorney who headed the church defense, told a Multnomah County Circuit jury that Scientology "ranks up among the most abused religions in the history of the world. Perhaps only the Jews have suffered more at the hands of their enemies." Cooley, ...
May 10, 1985
Church civil fraud trial nears end — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
The end of a civil fraud trial against the Church of Scientology and its founder L. Ron Hubbard drew unexpectedly closer Wednesday when the defense announced it would call no more witnesses on the church’s behalf. Defense attorney Earle C. Cooley surprised his opposition by resting the defense case early Wednesday in Multnomah County Circuit Court after one week of testimony and eight witnesses. Cooley’s decision means the church will not call any high-ranking officials to refute claims that the reclusive ...
May 8, 1985
Scientologists relieved of answering on tenets — The Oregonian (Portland)
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Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
Members of the Church of Scientology who appear as defense witnesses in a fraud case against their church will not have to answer questions about basic tenets of their religion, a Portland judge ruled Tuesday. Multnomah County Circuit Judge Donald H. Londer based his ruling on the constitutional right to religious freedom. "Religious beliefs are of no concern to the court," he said. "Basic tenets of religion will not be made the subject of examination." The ruling was a victory for ...
May 4, 1985
Judge frees Hubbard data from custody — The Oregonian (Portland)
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Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
Records of L. Ron Hubbard's World War II military service and medical treatment were released from court custody Friday by a Portland judge who decided they have become relevant to a fraud trial against the Church of Scientology. Circuit Judge Donald H. Londer ruled that defense testimony offered this week by the church would make the private records relevant to the claim by a Portland woman that the church and its founder, Hubbard, defrauded her in 1975. Londer reviewed several hundred ...
May 3, 1985
Enrollment in Scientology course told — The Oregonian (Portland)
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Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A former Portland man who enrolled Julie Christofferson Titchbourne in her first Scientology course in 1975 testified Thursday that Titchbourne willingly signed up for the class and that she was advised that the course material involved religion. "She came in already wanting to do the course," said William M. Landers, describing Titchbourne's first appearance at the Portland Church of Scientology mission in July 1975 when Titchbourne was 17. Titchbourne is suing the church and its founder, L. Ron Hubbard, in Multnomah ...
May 2, 1985
Scientologists open defense in civil suit — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A Church of Scientology member who said her involvement in the church helped free her life of drugs and excessive use of alcohol testified Wednesday that the church helped pay for a 1978 lawsuit she filed against opponents of the church. Jessica Marks, a former Portland resident, appeared as the first witness for the church in defense of a $42 million civil fraud trial in Multnomah County Circuit Court against the church and its founder, L. Ron Hubbard. The fraud suit ...
May 1, 1985
Founder of Scientology faces default judgement — The Oregonian (Portland)
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Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A Multnomah County judge entered a default judgment Tuesday against L. Ron Hubbard, the controversial founder of the Church of Scientology, as a long-running civil fraud trial against Hubbard and the church reached the halfway mark. Circuit Judge Donald H. Londer signed the default against the reclusive Hubbard at the conclusion of the plaintiff's case in the eighth week of trial. Hubbard, who has not been seen publicly since 1980, did not appear for the trial. Londer's ruling means Hubbard by ...
Apr 27, 1985
Ex-Scientologist testifies of 'insulation' effort — The Oregonian (Portland)
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Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
The Church of Scientology started making plans in 1980 to "insulate" church founder L. Ron Hubbard from legal attack and to protect his secret church-related income in advance of his disappearance from public view, a former Scientologist testified Friday. Laurel J. Sullivan, who used to work on Hubbard's personal staff, said she learned in February 1980 that Hubbard planned to go into hiding. She said she was assigned to a special mission "to insulate L. Ron Hubbard and his income lines ...
Apr 26, 1985
Judge said targeted by church — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A Portland judge who presided over a fraud trial involving the Church of Scientology in 1979 was the target of a covert operation by the church aimed at learning his attitudes about drug usage and sexual promiscuity, a former Scientologist testified Thursday. Martin L. Samuels, former head of the church in Portland, also testified that he and other church officials lied in the 1979 trial and that one reluctant ex-Scientologist was paid either $5,000 or $7,000 to testify on behalf of ...
Apr 26, 1985
Witness says Scientology founder veiled income — The Oregonian (Portland)
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Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A former personal secretary to L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the Church of Scientology, told a Portland jury Thursday about a secret system Hubbard used in the 1970s for collecting personal income from church organizations. Laurel J. Sullivan, who said she worked closely with Hubbard until he disappeared from public view in 1980, also testified that Hubbard held managerial control over numerous Scientology organizations despite his publicly announced "retirement" from church management in 1966. Contrary to a 1972 church policy ...
Apr 19, 1985
Witness says judge probed — The Oregonian (Portland)
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Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A Portland judge who presided over a fraud trial involving the Church of Scientology in 1979 was the target of a covert operation by the church aimed at learning his attitudes about drug usage and sexual promiscuity, a former Scientologist testified Thursday. Martin L. Samuels, former head of the church in Portland, also testified that he and other church officials lied in the 1979 trial and that one reluctant ex-Scientologist was paid either $5,000 or $7,000 to testify on behalf of ...
Apr 17, 1985
Court hears final Scientology tape — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
Jurors in the Church of Scientology fraud trial Tuesday listened to the last of five hours of surreptitiously-taped conversations in which a former Scientologist talked about a plan to "transform" church leadership by filing suit to take managerial control. "I think both of us want the organization to be transformed into something decent," Gerald D. Armstrong told a Scientologist who was involved in the effort to discredit Armstrong as a court witness by making tapes of the conversations without Armstrong's knowledge. ...
Apr 13, 1985
Two tapes not played at cult trial — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
Attorneys for the Church of Scientology finished their cross-examination of a former Scientologist Friday without attempting to use the last two of four surreptitiously recorded videotapes made for the purpose of discrediting him. The latter tapes, made in Los Angeles In November 1984 without the knowledge of Gerald D. Armstrong, a church critic who appeared on them, were delivered to Multnomah Circuit Judge Donald H. Londer Friday. Londer had learned of the existence of the tapes Thursday and ordered them produced ...
Apr 12, 1985
New secret tapes revealed in lawsuit — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
The existence of two more surreptitiously made videotapes involving conversations of a former member of the Church of Scientology was revealed in court Thursday, one day after church lawyers said they had no knowledge of any more such tapes. The new tapes bring to four the number of meetings in which the former Scientologist, who has attacked the church, was videotaped without his knowledge during meetings with church members who led him to believe they were trying to reform church practices. ...
Apr 11, 1985
Scientology trial jury views surreptiously made videotapes — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
The Church of Scientology struck back Wednesday against a former member who testified against the church by playing to a Portland jury videotapes, made surreptitiously, in which the man discussed placing phony documents in church files. Multnomah Circuit Judge Donald H. Londer allowed the 108 minutes of tapes, made in a Los Angeles park last November, to be played to the jury as evidence of bias on the part of Gerald D. Armstrong against the church. "I can create documents with ...
Apr 5, 1985
Judge rules out videotapes aimed at discrediting witness — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
An attempt to discredit a witness testifying against the Church of Scientology in a fraud trial hit a snag Thursday when a Portland judge called surreptitiously made videotapes an "amateurish performance" and refused to let them be shown to the jury. "I think they are devastating, devastating against the church," Multnomah Circuit Judge Donald H. Londer said out of the presence of the jury after viewing 108 minutes of tape recorded in a Los Angeles park last November. The tapes involved ...
Apr 2, 1985
Witness tells of income of Scientology founder — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A former Scientologist who said he helped manage L. Ron Hubbard's bank accounts testified Monday that the Scientology founder collected income of $200,000 to $1 million per week during a six-month period in 1982. Howard D. Schoemer, who left the Church of Scientology in December 1982, told a Multnomah County Circuit Court jury that the money was routed to Hubbard through Author Services Inc., a corporation that "supposedly had nothing to do with the church." Schoemer said the income to Hubbard ...
Mar 30, 1985
Ex-Scientologist testifies church founder's biography 'lies' — The Oregonian (Portland)
Mar 28, 1985
Jury told of Scientology 'attack' policy — The Oregonian (Portland)
Mar 27, 1985
Covert action claim made in testimony — The Oregonian (Portland)
Mar 22, 1985
Ex-Scientologists tried mutiny, court told — The Oregonian (Portland)
Mar 21, 1985
Ex-Scientology executive says church investigated plaintiff — The Oregonian (Portland)
Mar 20, 1985
Former Scientology official tells of stress on money — The Oregonian (Portland)
Mar 12, 1985
Scientology suit goes to trial for second time — The Oregonian (Portland)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Fred Leeson
Source: The Oregonian (Portland)
A young woman who once won and then lost more than $2 million in damages against the Church of Scientology in Portland started a second legal attack Monday on grounds that Scientologists defrauded her during nine months in 1975 and 1976. Julie Christofferson Titchbourne, who began her involvement with the church when she was 17, is asking a Multnomah County Circuit Court jury to return $3,253 she paid for courses and books and to award punitive damages as high as $42 ...
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