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Scientology library: “Joel Sappell”

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arthur ceppos • author services, inc. (asi) (dba, galaxy press) (subsidiary of church of spiritual technology) • cost • david miscavige • dianetics: the modern science of mental health (book) • earle c. cooley • federal bureau of investigation (fbi) • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • hana eltringham whitfield • harassment • heber c. jentzsch • internal revenue service (irs) • inurement • joel sappell • l. ron hubbard's credentials • l. ron hubbard's death • laurel j. sullivan (née watson) • lawsuit • legal • mary sue (whipp) hubbard • medical claims • operation snow white • patrick d. "pat" broeker (aka mike mitchell) • robert w. welkos • ronald "nibs" edward dewolf (l. ron hubbard, jr.)
25 matching items found between Jan 1990 and Dec 1994. Furthermore, there are 12 matching items for all time not shown.
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Page 1 of 1: ⇑ Latest    ↑ Later    Earlier ↓    Earliest ⇓
Sep 1, 1993
Catch a rising star — Premiere (magazine)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): John H. Richardson
Source: Premiere (magazine)
Tag(s): Ability (Scientology magazine)American Premiere (magazine)Andrea JaffeAnne ArcherAnti-psychiatryApple SchoolsAuditingAuthor Services, Inc. (ASI) (dba, Galaxy Press) (subsidiary of Church of Spiritual Technology)Bert SalzmanBlackmailBob DolmanBonnie ReissBrad PittBrian GrazerCelebrity (magazine)Celebrity CentreCharlie SheenChurch of Scientology International (CSI)Citizens Commission on Human Rights (CCHR)CommissionsCorey SlavinCostCreative Artists AgencyCry Out (booklet)Cult Awareness Network (CAN) (earlier form, Citizen's Freedom Foundation)David MiscavigeDelphi Schools, Inc.Diana CanovaDisconnectionDon SimpsonDror SorefE-MeterEarth Communications Office (ECO)Edgar WinterEmilio EstevezEric ShermanErnest LehmanFloyd MutruxFoundation for Advancements in Science and Education (FASE)Freddie PrinzeGary ImhoffGentle Birth FoundationGeoffrey LewisHana Eltringham WhitfieldHarassmentHarvey HaberHealthMedHeber C. JentzschJanet CharltonJeff PomerantzJeffrey ScottJerry SeinfeldJoel SappellJohn H. RichardsonJohn TravoltaJudy Norton-TaylorJuliette LewisJustice Clarence ThomasKaren BlackKelly PrestonKen RoseKimberley KatesKirstie AlleyL.A. Style (magazine)LawsuitLee PurcellLeo J. RyanLisa Marie PresleyLisa Stuart HalversonManu TupouMark C. "Marty" RathbunMark IshamMary Sue (Whipp) HubbardMichael D. RobertsMichael J. "Mike" RinderMichael OvitzMichael WisemanMike FarrellMilton KatselasMimi RogersMoney launderingNan Herst BowersNancy CartwrightNarconon InternationalNicole KidmanOperation Snow WhitePat KingsleyPatrick RyanPatrick SwayzePaulette CooperPeter HortonPhilip JepsenPremiere (magazine)Priscilla PresleyPrivate investigator(s)Project CelebrityPublic fundingPurification Rundown ("Purif")R. Michael WisnerReader's DigestRecruitmentReligious Technology Center (RTC)Richard BeharRichard DonnerRichard NataleRobert "Bobby" LiptonRobert W. WelkosRon HowardScientology's "Code of Honor"Scientology: The Thriving Cult of Greed and Power (article)Shaw Health CenterStudy technology (Study tech)Suppressive person (SP)Threat of physical harmTom CruiseTom MankiewiczVonni RibisiXenu (Operating Thetan level 3, OT 3, Wall of Fire)Yvonne Gillham Jentzsch
Jul 21, 1990
Only in L.A. — Los Angeles Times (California)
Jun 29, 1990
The Scientology Story: Attack the Attacker // The Battle With The 'Squirrels' // When the Doctrine Leaves the Church — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
The Church of Scientology hates "squirrels." That is the scornful word L. Ron Hubbard used to describe non-church members who offer his teachings, sometimes at cut-rate prices. Most are ex-Scientologists who say they believe in Hubbard's gospel but left the church because its hierarchy was too oppressive. "We call them squirrels," Hubbard once wrote, "because they are so nutty." Hubbard contended that only church members are qualified to administer his self-improvement-type courses. Outsiders, he said, inevitably misapply the teachings, wreaking spiritual ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 29, 1990
The Scientology Story: Attack the Attacker // A Lawyer Learns What It's Like to Fight the Church — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Joseph Yanny represented the movement until a falling out. Now he says lengthy litigation and mysterious harassment indicate he's become 'Public Enemy No. 1.' Los Angeles attorney Joseph Yanny was driving through rural Ohio in the pre-dawn hours in 1988 when he was pulled over by police, who had received a tip that he was carrying a cache of cocaine and guns in his rental car. A telephone caller had supplied authorities in Ohio with Yanny's name, the car's description and ...
Jun 29, 1990
The Scientology Story: Attack the Attacker // Neither Side Blinks in a Lengthy Feud — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Among its many adversaries, the Church of Scientology's longest-running feud has been with the Internal Revenue Service. So far, neither combatant has blinked. Over the past three decades, the IRS has revoked the tax-exempt status of various Scientology organizations, accusing them of operating in a commercial manner and of financially benefiting private individuals. From the late 1960s through mid-1970s, IRS agents classified Scientology as a "tax resister" and "subversive," a characterization later deemed improper by a judge. In 1984, the IRS's ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 29, 1990
The Scientology Story: Attack the Attacker // On the Offensive Against an Array of Suspected Foes — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
"Never treat a war like a skirmish. Treat all skirmishes like wars." —L. Ron Hubbard The Church of Scientology does not turn the other cheek. Ministers mingle with private detectives. "Sacred scriptures" counsel the virtues of combativeness. Parishioners double as paralegals for litigious church attorneys. Consider the passage that a prominent Scientology minister selected from the religion's scriptures, authored by the late L. Ron Hubbard, to inspire the faithful during a gala church event. "People attack Scientology," the minister quoted Hubbard ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 29, 1990
The Scientology Story: Attack the Attacker // Suits, Protests Fuel a Campaign Against Psychiatry — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
As part of its strategy, the movement created a nationwide uproar over the drug Ritalin, used to treat hyperactive children. In recent years, a national debate flared over Ritalin, a drug used for more than three decades to treat hyperactivity in children. Across the country, multimillion-dollar lawsuits were filed by parents who contended that their children had been harmed by the drug. Major news organizations—including The Times—devoted extensive coverage to whether youngsters were being turned into emotionally disturbed addicts by psychiatrists ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 28, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of a Best-selling Author // Costly Strategy Continues to Turn Out Bestsellers — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Call it one of the most remarkable success stories in modern publishing history. Since late 1985, at least 20 books by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard have become bestsellers. In March of 1988, nearly four decades after its initial publication, Hubbard's "Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health" was No. 1 on virtually every best-seller list in the country–including the New York Times. Ten hardcover science fiction novels Hubbard completed before his death four years ago also became bestsellers, four of ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 27, 1990
The Scientology Story: Reaching into Society // Church Seeks Influence in Schools, Business, Science — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Emerging from years of internal strife and public scandal, the Scientology movement has embarked on a sweeping and sophisticated campaign to gain new influence in America. The goal is to refurbish the tarnished image of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and elevate him to the ranks of history's great humanitarians and thinkers. By so doing, the church hopes to broaden the acceptability of Hubbard's Scientology teachings and attract millions of new members. The campaign relies on official church programs and a ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 27, 1990
The Scientology Story: Reaching into Society // Courting the Power Brokers — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
From politicians to the leaders of business, the courts and the media, the church works to win allies to smooth the way for expansion. To create a favorable environment for Scientology's expansion, church executives are working to win allies among society's power brokers and opinion leaders. It is a theme expounded in church publications."We need to be able to approach the right people in order to get things done," wrote Heber Jentzsch, president of the Church of Scientology International, in the ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 27, 1990
The Scientology Story: Reaching into Society // Foundation Funds Provide Assist to Celebrated Teacher Escalante — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
The Scientology movement's Foundation for Advancements in Science and Education has befriended one of America's most celebrated teachers, Jaime Escalante of Garfield High School. Escalante is the East Los Angeles teacher profiled in the hit 1988 film "Stand and Deliver," which chronicled his success in teaching advanced calculus to barrio students. During the last few years, the foundation has provided Escalante with tens of thousands of dollars for computers, audiovisual aids, tutors and scholarships. In addition, the foundation has solicited contributions ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 27, 1990
The Scientology Story: Reaching into Society // The Org Board — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
A key element of the management techniques Scientologists sell to businessmen is L. Ron Hubbard's "organizational board." Used also by the Church of Scientology, the "Org Board" divides an organization into seven divisions–executive, personnel, sales, finance, training, marketing and qualifications. Each division's duties are spelled out, along with the basis for evaluating employee performance. In describing the Org Board's virtues, Scientology consultants omit Hubbard's colorful account of its origins–an account reminiscent of one of his science fiction tales. During a 1965 ...
Jun 26, 1990
The Scientology Story: Inside the Church // Defectors Recount Lives of Hard Work, Punishment — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Doris Braine says the transformation of her Patty Jo was heartbreaking. "It was," she said, "like my darling daughter had died." Before Patty Jo went to work for the Church of Scientology at the age of 20, she had been "fun and pretty and a joy to be with," recalled her 72-year-old mother. "Suddenly, she became a totally different person, shooting fire from her eyes." There were those hateful looks, and the dozens of letters that Patty Jo returned unopened. For ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 25, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Selling of a Church // Church Markets Its Gospel With High-Pressure Sales — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Behind the religious trappings, the Church of Scientology is run like a lean, no-nonsense business in which potential members are called "prospects," "raw meat" and "bodies in the shop." Its governing financial policy, written by the late Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, is simple and direct: "MAKE MONEY, MAKE MORE MONEY, MAKE OTHERS PRODUCE SO AS TO MAKE MONEY." The organization uses sophisticated sales tactics to sell a seemingly endless progression of expensive courses, each serving as a prerequisite for the ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 25, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Selling of a Church // Shoring Up Its Religious Profile — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
The church has adopted the terminology and trappings of traditional theologies. But the IRS is not convinced. Since its founding some 35 years ago by the late science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, Scientology has worked hard to shore up its religious profile for the public, the courts and the Internal Revenue Service. In the old days, for example, those who purchased Hubbard's Scientology courses were called "students." Today, they are "parishioners." The group's "franchises" have become "missions." And Hubbard's teachings, ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 25, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Selling of a Church // The Courting of Celebrities — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Testimonials of the famous are prominent in the church's push for acceptability. John Travolta and Kirstie Alley are the current headliners. The Church of Scientology uses celebrity spokesmen to endorse L. Ron Hubbard's teachings and give Scientology greater acceptability in mainstream America. As far back as 1955, Hubbard recognized the value of famous people to his fledgling, off-beat church when he inaugurated "Project Celebrity." According to Hubbard, Scientologists should target prominent individuals as their "quarry" and bring them back like trophies ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Burglaries and Lies Paved a Path to Prison — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
It began with the title of a fairy tale — Snow White. That was the benign code name Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard gave to an ominous plan that would envelop his church in scandal and send its upper echelon to prison, a plan rooted in his ever-deepening fears and suspicions. Snow White began in 1973 as an effort by Scientology through Freedom of Information proceedings to purge government files of what Hubbard thought was false information being circulated worldwide to ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Chapter 1: The Mind Behind the Religion — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
It was a triumph of galactic proportions: Science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard had discarded the body that bound him to the physical universe and was off to the next phase of his spiritual exploration — "on a planet a galaxy away." "Hip, hip, hurray!" thousands of Scientologists thundered inside the Hollywood Palladium, where they had just been told of this remarkable feat. "Hip, hip, hurray! Hip, hip, hurray!" they continued to chant, gazing at a large photograph of Hubbard, creator ...
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Chapter 2: Creating the Mystique — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Hubbard's image was crafted of truth, distorted by myth. To his followers, L. Ron Hubbard was bigger than life. But it was an image largely of his own making. A Los Angeles Superior Court judge put it bluntly while presiding over a Church of Scientology lawsuit in 1984. Scientology's founder, he said, was "virtually a pathological liar" about his past. Hubbard was an intelligent and well-read man, with diverse interests, experience and expertise. But that apparently was not enough to satisfy ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Chapter 3: Life With L. Ron Hubbard — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Aides indulged his eccentricities and egotism. L. Ron Hubbard enjoyed being pampered. He surrounded himself with teen-age followers, whom he indoctrinated, treated like servants and cherished as though they were his own children. He called them the "Commodore's messengers." " 'Messenger!' " he would boom in the morning. "And we'd pull him out of bed," one recalled. The youngsters, whose parents belonged to Hubbard's Church of Scientology, would lay out his clothes, run his shower and help him dress. He taught ...
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Chapter 4: The Final Days — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Deep in hiding, Hubbard kept tight grip on the church. Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard often said that man's most basic drive is that of survival. And when it came to his own, he used whatever was necessary — false identities, cover stories, deception. There is no better illustration of this than the way he secretly controlled the Church of Scientology while hiding from a world he viewed as increasingly hostile. Hubbard was last seen publicly in February 1980, in the ...
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Church Scriptures Get High-Tech Protection — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Robert W. Welkos, Joel Sappell
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Scientology is determined that the words of L. Ron Hubbard shall live forever. Using state-of-the art technology, the movement has spent more than $15 million to protect Hubbard's original writings, tape-recorded lectures and filmed treatises from natural and man-made calamities, including nuclear holocaust. The effort illustrates two fundamental truths about the Scientology movement: It believes in its future and it never does anything halfheartedly. In charge of the preservation task is the Church of Spiritual Technology, which functions as archivist for ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Defining the Theology — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
What is Scientology? Not even the vast majority of Scientologists can fully answer the question. In the Church of Scientology, there is no one book that comprehensively sets forth the religion's beliefs in the fashion of, say, the Bible or the Koran. Rather, Scientology's theology is scattered among the voluminous writings and tape-recorded discourses of the late science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, who founded the religion in the early 1950s. Piece by piece, his teachings are revealed to church members ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // Staking a Claim to Blood Brotherhood — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: scs.cmu.edu
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
As L. Ron Hubbard told it, he was 4 years old when a medicine man named "Old Tom" made him a "blood brother" of the Blackfeet Indians of Montana, providing the inspiration for the Scientology founder's first novel, "Buckskin Brigades." But one expert on the tribe doesn't buy Hubbard's account. Historian Hugh Dempsey is associate director of the Glenbow Museum in Calgary, Canada. He has extensively researched the tribe, of which his wife is a member. He said that blood brothers ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 24, 1990
The Scientology Story: The Making of L. Ron Hubbard // The Man in Control — Los Angeles Times (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Joel Sappell, Robert W. Welkos
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
The Church of Scientology today is run by a high-school dropout who grew up at the knee of the late L. Ron Hubbard and wields power with the iron-fisted approach of his mentor. At 30, David Miscavige is chairman of the board of an organization that sits atop the bureaucratic labyrinth known as the Church of Scientology. This organization, the Religious Technology Center, owns the trademarks that Scientology churches need to operate, including the words Scientology and Dianetics. The Religious Technology ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.