Scientology Critical Information Directory

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Scientology library: “Cynthia Kisser”

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anson shupe • bankruptcy • cult awareness network (can) (earlier form, citizen's freedom foundation) • cynthia kisser • daniel a. leipold • deprogramming • freedom (scientology magazine) • george robertson • graham e. berry • heber c. jentzsch • internal revenue service (irs) • j. gordon melton • jason scott • kendrick l. moxon • laurie goodstein • lawsuit • margaret thaler singer • office of special affairs (osa) (formerly, guardian's office) • operation snow white • philip martino • priscilla coates • rick ross • seattle times • steven l. hayes • the american lawyer
15 matching items found between Jan 1995 and Dec 1999. Furthermore, there are 33 matching items for all time not shown.
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Sep 9, 1999
Scientology's revenge — New Times Los Angeles
Sep 1, 1998
When Scholars Know Sin — Skeptic magazine
More: skeptic.com
Type: Press
Author(s): Stephen A. Kent, Theresa Krebs
Source: Skeptic magazine
Dec 28, 1997
60 Minutes: The Cult Awareness Network — CBS News
Type: TV
Source: CBS News
Transcript: Descriptions of video in italics. VO=Voiceover of Lesley Stahl. LESLEY STAHL (in studio): There was a time if you were worried about your son or daughter being in a cult, you could get help from a small, non-profit organization called the Cult Awareness Network, or CAN, for 20 years the nation’s best-known resource for information and advice about groups it considered dangerous. Among them was Scientology, a church not known for turning the other cheek. But church officials say Scientology ...
Jun 1, 1997
Did Scientology strike back? — The American Lawyer
Type: Press
Author(s): Susan Hansen
Source: The American Lawyer
When the end finally came for the old Cult Awareness Network, it happened fast. Cynthia Kisser, CAN's executive director, struggled to stay calm as she sat in federal bankruptcy court in Chicago late last October waiting for the auction to begin. Kisser, who had spent the past nine years leading CAN's efforts to inform the public about dangerous cults, had hoped that she wouldn't have to pay much for her group's assets that day. Nor did she want much, she claims ...
Apr 1, 1997
The road to Heaven's Gate — Wall Street Journal
Jan 17, 1997
Scientologist purchases rights to identity of bankrupted anti-cult organization — Psychiatric News
More: link
Dec 23, 1996
New Twist In Anti-Cult Saga: Foe Is Now Ally -- Bellevue Man Who Put Group Into Bankruptcy Fires Scientology Lawyer — Seattle Times
Dec 19, 1996
Group that once criticized Scientologists now owned by one — CNN
Type: Press
Author(s): Dan Knapp
Source: CNN
From Correspondent Dan Knapp SAN FRANCISCO (CNN) – At one time, the Cult Awareness Network took as many as 16,000 telephone calls a year in an effort to help anxious families worried about sons or daughters involved with unconventional religions. But last month, after 20 years of operation, the Cult Awareness Network closed its doors, forced into bankruptcy after losing a costly lawsuit to the church of Scientology. Now the phones are ringing again – but this time there's a good ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Dec 1, 1996
It's a hostile takeover of a nonprofit — Seattle Times
Type: Press
Author(s): Laurie Goodstein
Source: Seattle Times
BARRINGTON, Ill. - Hostile takeovers are nothing new in the corporate world, but what happened to the Cult Awareness Network (CAN) is an exceptional tale of the hostile takeover of a nonprofit organization. The anti-cult advocacy group is being dismembered and absorbed by its adversaries, who attorneys say have deftly outmaneuvered CAN in the courts. CAN's fate highlights the crippled state of what was once a prominent movement that for years kept America's unorthodox religious groups on the defensive. The modern ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Dec 1, 1996
Scientologist Buys Bankrupt Cult-Fighting Organization — Seattle Times
Type: Press
Author(s): Laurie Goodstein
Source: Seattle Times
BARRINGTON, Ill. - For 20 years, the Cult Awareness Network ran the nation's best-known hotline for parents who grew distraught when unconventional religious groups they neither trusted nor understood suddenly won the allegiance of their children. From its offices in a Chicago suburb, the network (known as CAN) answered more than 350 telephone inquiries a week, counseled relatives at conferences attended by thousands and gave news interviews to everyone from small-town daily newspapers to "Nightline." As CAN's influence rose, so did ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 29, 1996
Cult fighters' future in doubt — Los Angeles Times (California)
More: scientology-lies.com, link
Type: Press
Source: Los Angeles Times (California)
Lawsuits: Group with controversial ties to deprogrammers files for bankruptcy and may be forced to shut down in wake of $1-million judgment. Plagued by numerous lawsuits from religious groups and fighting a $1.1-million judgment against it, the Cult Awareness Network has filed for bankruptcy under Chapter 7 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. "How we will operate or if we will continue to operate in the short term, I don't know," said Cynthia Kisser, executive director of the 12-year-old organization, known for ...
Jun 7, 1996
BU's Scientology Connection - More Responses — Boston Phoenix
Type: Press
Source: Boston Phoenix
I am a musician, mainly a bassist, in the local area. My lovely mug has graced the pages of your paper on occasion, featured, you may recall, with my band of a few years back called Brouhaha or, more recently, with Earthwurm. I am also an ordained priest of the Order of Vedantan Monists. If you consult rudimentary reference materials, you will find that Vedanta has been the voice of religious freedom for about the last seven to ten thousand years. ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Apr 29, 1996
Ministers oppose schoolchildren's essay contest // HCISD board member distributes material with Scientologist links in classrooms — Valley Morning Star (Texas)
More: link
Type: Press
Author(s): Kate Mewhinney
Source: Valley Morning Star (Texas)
HCISD board member distributes material with Scientologist links in classrooms A coalition of Harlingen minister has taken a stance against an essay contest for schoolchildren based on a book written by Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. The Harlingen Ministerial Alliance, which is made up of representatives from about 12 churches in Harlingen, said it is opposed to the distribution of The Way to Happiness booklets as part of the essay contest. "If this group is permitted in classrooms, then ...
Apr 18, 1996
It Happens // Or does it? When it comes to Landmark Education corporation, there's no meeting of the minds. — Denver Westword News
Type: Press
Author(s): Steve Jackson
Source: Denver Westword News
Walter Plywaski placed the blue yarmulke on his head. A Jew by ethnicity but an atheist by choice, he rarely wore the symbol of faith. But it seemed important now, as he stood near a mass burial site for Jews murdered at what had once been the Riederloh "punishment" camp in Germany. Somewhere beneath the stone markers, he believed, were the remains of the father he'd seen beaten to death for cursing an SS commandant in January 1945. Fifty years later, ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
May 21, 1995
Investing it // If the hair is gray, con artists see green — New York Times
Type: Press
Author(s): Constance L. Hays
Source: New York Times
BETTY NORMAN was no match for the telephone con men who emptied her pockets of more than $40,000. A plain-talking widow who runs a small motel in Ionia, Mich., a town of state prisons and apple orchards, Mrs. Norman, born and raised here, was taught to believe that people are essentially honest. So she trusted salespeople who picked up details about her life in seemingly casual telephone chat while pitching her pens, costume jewelry and other trinkets. And after being swindled ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.