Scientology Critical Information Directory

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Scientology library: “David Root”

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9/11 • carolyn hamaker • clark carr • clear body, clear mind (book) • david e. root • detox • downtown medical • foundation for advancements in science and education (fase) • fraud, lie, deceit, misrepresentation • front groups • james "jim" woodworth • james g. barnes • joseph "joe" higgins • keith w. miller • margarita lopez • medical claims • nanette asimov • narconon (aka scientology drug rehab) • new york rescue workers detoxification program • ooze towel • purification rundown ("purif") • san francisco chronicle (california) • schools • steven a. lager • tom cruise
11 matching items found.
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Mar 27, 2011
Narconon’s Big Con — The Fix
Type: Press
Author(s): Mark Ebner, Walter Armstrong
Source: The Fix
The Scientology-backed rehab promises addicts they can sweat out their demons in sweltering saunas. But critics charge that the organization is the devil itself. L. Ron Hubbard, the prolific science fiction author and founder of the Church of Scientology, may have been judged “a mental case” (according to the F.B.I.) and “a pathological liar” (according to a Los Angeles Supreme Court judge), but to tens of thousands of his eager followers worldwide, the man discovered an approach to recovery that outclasses ...
Aug 8, 2008
RE: In the matter of Absylom Kwabena Nyamekye, M.D. — State of New York
May 30, 2007
The Rundown on Scientology's Purification Rundown — New York Press
Type: Press
Author(s): John DeSio
Source: New York Press
“I'm not here converting these men and women to Scientology. And I've got to tell you something—I've been a Scientologist 20 years. In Sacramento I, more than any other Scientologist, got new people into Scientology, me personally. I'm very good at converting people, if I want to.” Jim Woodworth is the director of the New York Rescue Workers' Detoxification Project, and he is bristling at the suggestion that his program is an arm of the Church of Scientology. He insists that ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Feb 22, 2007
Scientology does detox — Sacramento News & Review
Type: Press
Author(s): Luke Gianni
Source: Sacramento News & Review
David E. Root, M.D, has traveled the world on a mission to rid its inhabitants of fat-soluble toxins. From Chernobyl to Ground Zero in New York City, Root has promoted a detoxification program that he claims has helped thousands suffering ailments like radiation poisoning and asbestos exposure. Many medical professionals have criticized the program he uses as ineffective and scientifically unsound, even dangerous. Critics point out that the program’s inventor, the late L. Ron Hubbard, founder of the Church of Scientology, ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Oct 21, 2004
Poisons, Begone! // The dubious science behind the Scientologists' detoxification program for 9/11 rescue workers — Slate Magazine
More: Sidebar
Type: Press
Author(s): Amanda Schaffer
Source: Slate Magazine
In September 2002, the New York Rescue Workers Detox Project began to offer free "detoxification treatment" to firefighters, police officers, and others exposed to high levels of toxic debris in the aftermath of the World Trade Center's collapse. The detox program—based on the teachings of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard and detailed in his book Clear Body, Clear Mind—purports to "flush" poisons from the body's fat stores using an intensive regimen of jogging, oil ingestion, sauna, and high doses of vitamins, ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jul 2, 2004
CALIFORNIA State to evaluate Narconon // Research group tapped to look at anti-drug teachings — San Francisco Chronicle (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Nanette Asimov
Source: San Francisco Chronicle (California)
State schools chief Jack O'Connell has asked a research group known for its rigorous reviews of health curriculum to spend three months evaluating the Narconon anti-drug program, whose classroom instruction has been linked to the Church of Scientology. At a press conference today in East Los Angeles, O'Connell will announce that the California Healthy Kids Resource Center, a public agency in Hayward, will look at what Narconon is teaching thousands of students in its hourlong presentations at dozens of schools each ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 18, 2004
Tom Cruise opens rescue workers detox clinic — Illustrated News
Type: Press
Author(s): Margaret Whitely
Source: Illustrated News
Tom Cruise, the well-known actor, has consistently pledged his support to the many rescue workers who are suffering the effects of the toxic assault on the nervous system, and lungs associated with the cleanup of Ground Zero as a result of the aftermath of the terrorist attack on September 11 on the World Trade Center. Cruise, working with many of the doctors involved in the project, and along with firefigher Joe Higgins, opened a facility in New York that utilizes one ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jun 9, 2004
What Narconon tells students — San Francisco Chronicle (California)
Type: Press
Author(s): Nanette Asimov
Source: San Francisco Chronicle (California)
Narconon's school program sends students a strong anti-drug message about alcohol, tobacco and marijuana in grades three to 12 and about harder drugs in the upper grades. The program's instructors tell kids that drugs are poison. But here are some other things they tell kids about addiction, which the medical experts interviewed by The Chronicle rejected as not scientifically based: – Drugs – including ecstasy, LSD and marijuana – accumulate indefinitely in body fat, where they cause recurring drug cravings for ...
Item contributed by: Ron Sharp
Jan 31, 1999
Scientology: A church and its foes / Church's roots run deep in the Inland area — Press-Enterprise (Riverside, California)
Foundation for Advancements in Science and Education: Form 990 filings
International Academy of Detoxification Specialists: Form 990 filings
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Other web sites with precious media archives. There is also a downloadable SQL dump of this library (use it as you wish, no need to ask permission.)   In May 2008, Ron Sharp's hard work consisting of over 1260 FrontCite tagged articles were integrated with this library. There are more contributors to this library. This library currently contains over 6000 articles, and more added everyday from historical archives.